DE

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Germany

Ford Taunus 17M P5 1964-1967

The P5 range was introduced in 1964 and comprised the 17M and 20M models. Show here is the Ford Taunus 17M P5

1964 Ford Taunus 17M

1964 Ford Taunus 17M P5

1964 Ford Taunus 17M

1964 Ford Taunus 17M

Ford Taunus 17M P3 1960-1964

Ford Taunus 17M P3 1960-1964

1960 Ford Taunus 17M

1960 Ford Taunus 17M P3

 

1960 Ford Taunus 17M

1960 Ford Taunus 17M

Ford Taunus 1948-1951

The 1948-1951 Ford Taunus was known as the "Buckel" (similar to 'fastback')

1948 Ford Taunus

1948 Ford Taunus

1948 Ford Taunus

1948 Ford Taunus

Taunus 12M P4 1962-1966

Lauched in 1962 the P4 was a car with modern looks and a new V4 1183cc engine. It was Ford's first mid-sized car with front-wheel drive. It was originally designed with the US market in mind.

1963 Ford Taunus 12M

1963 Ford Taunus 12M P4

Taunus 12M P6 1966-1970

The Taunus P6 was a development of the P4 and comprised the 12M and 15M from 1966-1970

1966 Ford Taunus 12M

1966 Ford Taunus 12M P6

1966 Ford Taunus 12M

1966 Ford Taunus 12M P6

1966 Ford Taunus 12M

Ford Taunus 1970s models

Ford Taunus 1970s models known in Germany as the 'Knudsen' models.

1970 Ford Taunus

1970 Ford Taunus

1972 Ford Taunus

1972 Ford Taunus

1976 Ford Taunus

1976 Ford Taunus

Ford Germany

Ford started assembling the Model T in Berlin in 1925. Ford established a factory in Cologne in Germany in 1931 where production started with the Model B. The Köln was almost identical to the British Ford 8, the first Ford to be built at Dagenham. The 1157cc Eifel was a very popular model. The Taunus appeared just before World War II but was not produced in large numbers. It was continued in 1948 with the same engine. The name Taunus was later used for all Fords built in Germany until 1968 when Ford built identical Ford Escort cars in Germany and

DKW (DE) 1916-1964

The name DKW is derived from Dampf - Kraft - Wagen (Steam powered
vehicle) as the first vehicle Danish engineer Jürgen Skafte Rasmussen
built (in 1916) was a light steam car. Like so many other
manufacturers, DKW were also famous for their motorcycles and by the
1930's DKW was in fact the world's largest motorcycle manufacturer.

In 1928 a new two-stroke engine was manufactured to power the first DKW car.
The same engine design was later used by SAAB in their 92, 93 and 96
models.

Various racing Porsches

The sixth Goodwood Festival of Speed, held in June 1998, celebrated Porsche's 50 years of racing supremacy. Among the more than 70 famous Porsches racing up the drive past Goodwood House were the 356 Gmund Coupé 1.1 litre and the 1938 1 litre Typ 64K10.

 

Porsche 356

These are the first series, built from 1948 to 1952 with a split windscreen and very low bumpers. These cars were built in Gmünd until 1951 when Porsche moved back to Stuttgart.

Porsche 356

1949 Porsche 356
 
 

Porsche 356

1949 Porsche 356

 

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